Experienced with lye/sodium hypochloride as a stripper ?

Have a questions on finishing, refinishing, or restoring <br />wood furniture or cabinetry? This is the place to ask!

Moderators: AsonnyA, Bob Boardman

chrisplantation
Regular
Regular
Posts: 13
Joined: Fri Nov 15, 2013 2:29 pm
Location: Jamaica

Experienced with lye/sodium hypochloride as a stripper ?

Postby chrisplantation » Fri Nov 22, 2013 11:06 pm

Quality stripper that costs $15 a gallon in the usa costs close to $80 down here.
This make it impossible for a customer to afford to strip many items.
We've all heard horror stories about caustic soda, but I am going to have to use it because its cheap and does the job.
Any body have info on how professional strippers used it/ Hot baths? Size ?
How heated? Temp ? Time ? Which woods affected and how? Become hairy or dark etc I hear. Any info appreciated even backyard projects.

Chris

AsonnyA
Refinish/Repair Wiz
Refinish/Repair Wiz
Posts: 1063
Joined: Thu Oct 26, 2006 6:43 am

Postby AsonnyA » Tue Nov 26, 2013 5:38 pm

Been looking for a writeup I have, somewhere. Got it from a friend who had good experience. Will post when I find it.

Sonny

chrisplantation
Regular
Regular
Posts: 13
Joined: Fri Nov 15, 2013 2:29 pm
Location: Jamaica

Postby chrisplantation » Wed Nov 27, 2013 7:44 am

Thanks Sonny - read a lot online - tried it cold-does not work at all. Needs a tank big enough to immerse an entire chair that can be heated with propane underneath- trying to find something - please still pass on the info if you get it. I will post what I got in case anybody does a search in the future.

Chris

AsonnyA
Refinish/Repair Wiz
Refinish/Repair Wiz
Posts: 1063
Joined: Thu Oct 26, 2006 6:43 am

Postby AsonnyA » Wed Nov 27, 2013 12:52 pm

Found it.

You say you tried it cold. Not sure what that means. Anyway, here's the writeup.

A solution of common lye will remove the milk paint, which has a casein base, not a solvent base. Make up a 20% solution: 1 lb of lye to 5 lbs of water (5 pints).

This is very toxic and corrosive stuff. Do it outdoors and wear eye protection, long rubber gloves and old clothes.

Make up a gallon of 50% vinegar and 50% water, for neutralizing the lye solution. Keep it handy, in an open bucket, for neutralizing spills and splashes on the skin and clothes.

Brush the solution on with a nylon bristle brush. It won't take long to act. When the paint has loosened, brush it off and hose down the wood, thoroughly. Wash with the vinegar solution and rinse with clean water. Dry with old rags or paper towels.

This is a nasty job and sometimes it may be easier to just sand the paint off, if it doesn't have a lot of carved detail or tight crevices to be cleaned out.

This info I recieved from a fellow engineer/friend, Dale Barber, very knowledgeable.

If I may hijack this thread:
On a side note, Dale, now deceased, was married to Dee Seton Barber, the adopted daughter of Ernest Thompson Seton (Founder of University of New Mexico and co-founder of The Boys Scouts here in America, among other notable accomplishments). Both Dale and Dee were very accomplished in their own rights. I take this opportunity to honor and make tribute to Dale and Dee. They were really acceptional people and an asset to our overall society. Good friends I've missed, but not forgotten.

Here's 2 photos of Dale, doing one of the things he loved, playing his fiddle. He's on the left, in the pic. http://feed509.photobucket.com/albums/s ... 9/feed.rss
and here:
http://www.myheritage.com/photo-2502431 ... e-with-him

Sonny

chrisplantation
Regular
Regular
Posts: 13
Joined: Fri Nov 15, 2013 2:29 pm
Location: Jamaica

Postby chrisplantation » Wed Nov 27, 2013 3:08 pm

Thanks ! By cold I meant room temp - about 4 tablespoons in a quart of water - hadnt done a darn thing after 2 hours. It was alkyd/enamel type
paint , not milk paint which is I think natural/organic and easily affecyed by the lye ( like human skin :-((
I read all over the net that you have to heat it almost to boiling in a large container and sink the entire piece of furniture in it. I am going to try to find or make a tank.
I could make money at that.
Here are some scraps of info from about 4 sources.

******************************


Well before todays sea of commercial chemical- and solvent-based paint removers flooded the market, folks set on stripping mixed up their own. This caustic-type stripper is concocted to taste from common ingredients that cost next-to-nothing.


1lb household lye (caustic soda)

2 or more boxes grocery corn starch


In a non-metallic container, such as a joint-compound bucket, gradually dissolve lye in 2 gallons of warm water. Start with a medium-strength solution Ñ say 2oz. lye per gallon of water. Test for effectiveness, then increase concentration if desired. Make a pasty stripper by mixing corn starch and water in another bucket. When the water is milky, slowly blend it into the lye solution.


Apply with a tampico-bristle (whitewash) brush; the stripper is particularly practical for removing paint on masonry. However, like all caustic strippers, this mix is highly basic and will darken some hardwoods. Test first in an inconspicuous area and rinse the surface thoroughly before repainting. Most important, work carefully while mixing and applying the stripper. Wear eye protection and rubber gloves, making sure to rinse skin immediately if it comes in contact with stripper.

Use vinegar to neutralise the lye and then water rinse.


muriatic acid is mentioned elsewhere as a neutraliser for caustic soda which is rinsed off afterwards

A solution of sodium hydroxide in water was traditionally used as the most common paint stripper on wooden objects. Its use has become less common, because it can damage the wood surface, raising the grain and staining the colour


mix with water About a table spoon lye per cup water. Wear some good chemical gloves and a face sheild and keep a jug of vinegar around to neutralize spills. If you want to remove paint it will do the trick as well and cheaper than anything else and doesn't have the vapor of the Easy Off.

Jyotsna579
Newcomer
Newcomer
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri May 24, 2019 7:23 am
Location: India
Contact:

Re: Experienced with lye/sodium hypochloride as a stripper ?

Postby Jyotsna579 » Sun May 26, 2019 11:10 pm

It was a great information.


Return to “Q&A Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 17 guests