Pest spray damage on kitchen table

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jaykay
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Pest spray damage on kitchen table

Postby jaykay » Sat Jun 18, 2011 6:50 am

Good morning....new member here. A family member sprayed themselves with OFF on their way out to do some yard work and a fair amount landed on the kitchen table and hardwood floor. It has now dried and the surfaces are now 'bumpy'. I think the table is laminated. Not sure how to go about dealing with this without making it worse. Advice would be appreciated. Thanks.

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Postby AsonnyA » Sat Jun 18, 2011 7:49 am

Do you have any idea how long, after the spraying, it took for the OFF to affect the two finishes, to cause them to bubble-up? I assume the bumps are more pinhead size or smaller, rather than "normal" drop size or larger.

About how large of surface area, on each the table and floor, has been affected?

Sonny

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Postby jaykay » Sat Jun 18, 2011 9:47 am

Thanks for your reply. It's been almost 24 hours. The droplets are pinhead size. On the table it's about an area 18" square. On the floor, and to a lesser extent on the chairs, it's less noticeable and less thick.

John

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Postby Leelee » Sun Jun 19, 2011 2:20 pm

I wonder, could a light rub with white vinegar help you? This is an old trick for removing water rings on wood furniture, IIRC.

Sonny, you are the best when it comes to encouraging persistence in people. This is something that I am sure can be easily solved. Bonus: we now know to apply our OFF outside!

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Postby AsonnyA » Sun Jun 19, 2011 6:22 pm

DEET is toluamide, similar in properties as toulene and benzine, both used as solvents. Page down to "reactivity profile" - http://cameochemicals.noaa.gov/chemical/20199

I was going to go test some finishes (oil and water based), to see, for myself, what happens, though I have a good idea, and a possible fix. I haven't made time to do that, yet.

Sonny

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Postby jaykay » Sun Jun 19, 2011 9:50 pm

The plot thickens. It wasn't OFF at all...but a spray deodorant. My wife and I both assumed it was OFF. A knowledgeable associate at Home Depot suggested it probably is the propellant in the spray that's sticking to the wood. And if soap and water doesn't do the trick the table top may need to be refinished. No success with white vinegar.

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Postby Leelee » Mon Jun 20, 2011 4:17 pm

The propellant...possibly a petroleum-based product...? I know a trick for removing candle wax and maybe it would work for you.

Heat your iron to a low setting, like silk. Place a sheet of wax paper over a perimeter part of the spray and apply the iron for about 10 seconds. Remove the iron and paper and hopefully the overspray will have adhered to the paper.

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Postby AsonnyA » Mon Jun 20, 2011 4:28 pm

Try WD-40. Test a spot under the table top, to make sure your topcoat finish won't be affected.

Sonny

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Postby jaykay » Mon Jun 20, 2011 8:43 pm

Ixnay on the WD-40.... though it did leave a nice shine. I'm a little hesitant to attempt the iron trick that Leelee suggested. I think we're headed towards a refinishing project when, and if, we decide to do something. But thanks for all of your suggestions!

RyanLincoln

Postby RyanLincoln » Sat Jun 25, 2011 5:08 am

You can buff the piece with a paste wax, or use a little lemon oil. It's best to use only products containing natural ingredients. For the best furniture cleaning options, ask the salesperson or antique dealer from whom your purchased the piece what he or she recommends.

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Re:

Postby AsonnyA » Mon Sep 03, 2018 7:35 pm

jaykay wrote:Ixnay on the WD-40.... though it did leave a nice shine. I'm a little hesitant to attempt the iron trick that Leelee suggested. I think we're headed towards a refinishing project when, and if, we decide to do something. But thanks for all of your suggestions!


Well, if you commit to refinishing the whole, then you could try another approach, since you're to refinish, anyway.

You say the affected area is now bumpy. Gently and carefully, with a small sharp "tool" or the sharp edge of a credit card, try scraping off a bump or two, see if the material will come off from being stuck onto the finish, without affecting the finish. The bumps just might be stuck to the finish, yet not bonded to it. I'm thinking the stuff may have just dried onto the surface, not penetrated into it. Carefully scraping it off might not leave a blemish.

Sonny

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Re: Pest spray damage on kitchen table

Postby Bob Boardman » Wed Sep 05, 2018 9:39 am

I'd try determining what finish is on the table first. Unless the table is more than 75 years old the finish is either lacquer or a varnish/poly finish. Use a cotton swab dipped in lacquer thinner on an inconspicuous spot. If the finish comes off or gets sticky it's a lacquer finish. If not it's a varnish/poly finish. If a lacquer finish.

If a lacquer finish, there are 2 products that can be used for this type of repair. One is a "Lacquer Flowout" the other is a "Blush Remover". These are sold as a liquid to add to lacquer/use as a rub on; or as ready to use product in a spray can. The spray is easier, but the rub on gives more control. See links below

These type of products reconstitutes the lacquer and either allow any moisture under/in the finish to evaporate, or cause the lacquer flowout to a level finish. If a spray can, LIGHTLY spray some on the affected area - it's better to use a number of light coats instead of 1 heavy coat. If using the liquid, make a ball out of clean Tshirt material that has just come out of dryer, so it's lint free - this is called a 'rubber'. Place a small amount of liquid on the surface (just enough to make it damp, but not wet), this is called 'charging' the rubber. Wearing gloves and working in a well ventilated area, go over the affected area in a motion like a plane coming in for a landing, and then quickly taking off again. Do this 7 - 8 times then stop and assess. If more passes needed recharge (apply a bit more solvent to) the rubber and make 7-8 more passes. Do this until surface is level and smooth.

https://www.woodshopproducts.com/MOHAWK ... 3-0475.htm

http://www.hoodfinishing.com/2016-Catal ... lvents.pdf
Bob "Boardman" Borders


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